The Digestion Formula

$60.00

Qty

60 capsules per bottle

Product Description

Our Digestion Formula contains Pama Oregano, Una De Gato, Sangre De Grado, Menta & Paico.

Pama Oregano relieves inflammation and eliminates toxins in the body. It also has antibacterial properties and prevents diarrhea.

Una De Gato aids with gastritis, ulcers, and various intestinal disorders. It is effective for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and leaky gut syndrome, and can inhibit stress-induced ulcer formation. It is also used for diarrhea and stomach aches.

Sangre De Grado contains a chemical called Crofelemer which reduces diarrhea. Sangre de Drago can help eliminate the H. pylori bacteria that are responsible for causing peptic ulcers in many people.

Menta improves Irritable Bowel Syndrome. It is characterized by digestive symptoms like stomach pain, gas, bloating and changes in bowel habits.

Paico eliminates parasites and also improves intestinal transit. This plant has an antispasmodic and carminative property. That means that it is one of the natural remedies for intestinal gas from the digestive tract, stomach cramps or spasms.

A combination of all 5 herbs, Makes a strong army to enhance your digestion system.

Further Reading

 

Digestion is important because your body needs nutrients from food and drink to work properly and stay healthy. Proteinsfatscarbohydratesvitaminsminerals, and water are nutrients. Your digestive system breaks nutrients into parts small enough for your body to absorb and use for energy, growth, and cell repair.

The digestive system is made up of the gastrointestinal tract—also called the GI tract or digestive tract—and the liverpancreas, and gallbladder. The GI tract is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus. The hollow organs that make up the GI tract are the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and anus. The liver, pancreas, and gallbladder are the solid organs of the digestive system.

The small intestine has three parts. The first part is called the duodenum. The jejunum is in the middle and the ileum is at the end. The large intestine includes the appendix, cecum, colon, and rectum. The appendix is a finger-shaped pouch attached to the cecum. The cecum is the first part of the large intestine. The colon is next. The rectum is the end of the large intestine.

Bacteria in your GI tract, also called gut flora or microbiome, help with digestion. Parts of your nervous and circulatory systems also help. Working together, nerves, hormones, bacteria, blood, and the organs of your digestive system digest the foods and liquids you eat or drink each day.

Each part of your digestive system helps to move food and liquid through your GI tract, break food and liquid into smaller parts, or both. Once foods are broken into small enough parts, your body can absorb and move the nutrients to where they are needed. Your large intestine absorbs water, and the waste products of digestion become stool. Nerves and hormones help control the digestive process.

Food moves through your GI tract by a process called peristalsis. The large, hollow organs of your GI tract contain a layer of muscle that enables their walls to move. The movement pushes food and liquid through your GI tract and mixes the contents within each organ. The muscle behind the food contracts and squeezes the food forward, while the muscle in front of the food relaxes to allow the food to move.

Mouth. Food starts to move through your GI tract when you eat. When you swallow, your tongue pushes the food into your throat. A small flap of tissue, called the epiglottis, folds over your windpipe to prevent choking and the food passes into your esophagus.

Esophagus. Once you begin swallowing, the process becomes automatic. Your brain signals the muscles of the esophagus and peristalsis begins.

Lower esophageal sphincter. When food reaches the end of your esophagus, a ringlike muscle—called the lower esophageal sphincter —relaxes and lets food pass into your stomach. This sphincter usually stays closed to keep what’s in your stomach from flowing back into your esophagus.

Stomach. After food enters your stomach, the stomach muscles mix the food and liquid with digestive juices. The stomach slowly empties its contents, called chyme, into your small intestine.

Small intestine. The muscles of the small intestine mix food with digestive juices from the pancreas, liver, and intestine, and push the mixture forward for further digestion. The walls of the small intestine absorb water and the digested nutrients into your bloodstream. As peristalsis continues, the waste products of the digestive process move into the large intestine.

Large intestine. Waste products from the digestive process include undigested parts of food, fluid, and older cells from the lining of your GI tract. The large intestine absorbs water and changes the waste from liquid into stool. Peristalsis helps move the stool into your rectum.

Rectum. The lower end of your large intestine, the rectum, stores stool, until it pushes stool out of your anus during a bowel movement.

As food moves through your GI tract, your digestive organs break the food into smaller parts using:

  • motion, such as chewing, squeezing, and mixing
  • digestive juices, such as stomach acid, bile, and enzymes

Mouth. The digestive process starts in your mouth when you chew. Your salivary glands make saliva, a digestive juice, which moistens food so it moves more easily through your esophagus into your stomach. Saliva also has an enzyme that begins to break down starches in your food.

Esophagus. After you swallow, peristalsis pushes the food down your esophagus into your stomach.

Stomach. Glands in your stomach lining make stomach acid and enzymes that break down food. Muscles of your stomach mix the food with these digestive juices.

Pancreas. Your pancreas makes a digestive juice that has enzymes that break down carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The pancreas delivers the digestive juice to the small intestine through small tubes called ducts.

Liver. Your liver makes a digestive juice called bile that helps digest fats and some vitamins. Bile ducts carry bile from your liver to your gallbladder for storage, or to the small intestine for use.

Gallbladder. Your gallbladder stores bile between meals. When you eat, your gallbladder squeezes bile through the bile ducts into your small intestine.

Small intestine. Your small intestine makes digestive juice, which mixes with bile and pancreatic juice to complete the breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Bacteria in your small intestine make some of the enzymes you need to digest carbohydrates. Your small intestine moves water from your bloodstream into your GI tract to help break down food. Your small intestine also absorbs water with other nutrients.

Large intestine. In your large intestine, more water moves from your GI tract into your bloodstream. Bacteria in your large intestine help break down remaining nutrients and make vitamin K. Waste products of digestion, including parts of food that are still too large, become stool.

The small intestine absorbs most of the nutrients in your food, and your circulatory system passes them on to other parts of your body to store or use. Special cells help absorbed nutrients cross the intestinal lining into your bloodstream. Your blood carries simple sugars, amino acids, glycerol, and some vitamins and salts to the liver. Your liver stores, processes, and delivers nutrients to the rest of your body when needed.

The lymph system NIH external link, a network of vessels that carry white blood cells and a fluid called lymph throughout your body to fight infection, absorbs fatty acids and vitamins.

Your body uses sugars, amino acids, fatty acids, and glycerol to build substances you need for energy, growth, and cell repair.

Your hormones and nerves work together to help control the digestive process. Signals flow within your GI tract and back and forth from your GI tract to your brain.

Cells lining your stomach and small intestine make and release hormones that control how your digestive system works. These hormones tell your body when to make digestive juices and send signals to your brain that you are hungry or full. Your pancreas also makes hormones that are important to digestion.

You have nerves that connect your central nervous system—your brain and spinal cord—to your digestive system and control some digestive functions. For example, when you see or smell food, your brain sends a signal that causes your salivary glands to “make your mouth water” to prepare you to eat.

You also have an enteric nervous system (ENS)—nerves within the walls of your GI tract. When food stretches the walls of your GI tract, the nerves of your ENS release many different substances that speed up or delay the movement of food and the production of digestive juices. The nerves send signals to control the actions of your gut muscles to contract and relax to push food through your intestines.

There are at least 10 digestive disorders.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

If you have heartburn or acid reflux more than a couple of times a week, you may have Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, or GERD. The esophagus moves swallowed food down to your stomach. A ring of muscles—the lower esophageal sphincter (LES)—connects the stomach and esophagus. When the LES is weak, stomach acid can leak back up into your esophagus and cause heartburn. This can cause serious damage to your esophagus over time. About 20% of Americans suffer from GERD. You can treat GERD with lifestyle changes, such as changing what and when you eat, and eating smaller meals. Antacids or prescription-strength acid blockers can also help.

Peptic Ulcer Disease (PUD) and Gastritis

PUD is an open sore in the lining of the stomach or upper part of the small intestine. It affects over 15 million Americans. Gastritis is inflammation of the stomach lining. These two conditions have similar symptoms, including stomach pain and nausea, and similar causes. A bacterial infection— H. pylori—is the most common cause of PUD and often causes chronic gastritis. NSAIDs—including aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen—are another common cause. Antacids and proton pump inhibitors often help. Antibiotics treat H. pylori infection.

Stomach Flu

Stomach flu—or gastroenteritis—is an infection of the stomach and upper part of the small intestine. Common symptoms are diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, and cramps. Rotavirus and norovirus, which affect millions of people every year, are often the cause. Gastroenteritis often clears up on its own, but you lose fluids through diarrhea and vomiting. Prevent dehydration by drinking water and electrolyte drinks.

Gluten Sensitivity and Celiac Disease

Symptoms of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease are similar. They include diarrhea, bloating, and abdominal pain. Gluten sensitivity is relatively common, affecting about 5% of the U.S. population. True celiac disease affects less than 1%. It’s important to see your doctor for a correct diagnosis—don’t try to self-diagnose. Unlike gluten sensitivity, celiac is an autoimmune disease that can damage the small intestine. Eliminating gluten—a protein in wheat, rye, barley and oats—from your diet is the main treatment for both conditions.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) refers to long-lasting inflammation in the digestive tract. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are the two most common types of inflammatory bowel disease. IBD affects about 1.5 million Americans, including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. They are autoimmune diseases, which means there is an abnormal immune system reaction. IBD causes irritation and swelling, resulting in diarrhea, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, fever, and weight loss. Crohn’s disease mainly affects the end of the small bowel and the beginning of the colon. Ulcerative colitis affects just the colon and rectum. Drugs that block your immune response can treat IBD. Sometimes surgery is necessary.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

People sometimes confuse IBS with IBD. IBS is abdominal pain that occurs at least three times a month for three months in a row. You also might have constipation or diarrhea. Unlike IBD, IBS doesn’t harm the digestive tract and it’s far more common. More than 15 million Americans have IBS. The exact cause of IBS is unclear. Treatment may include eating smaller meals and avoiding foods that cause symptoms. Some people take laxatives, fiber supplements, or probiotics to treat IBS.

Constipation

Constipation is difficult or infrequent passage of stool. If you have bowel movements less than three times a week, you likely are constipated. Chronic constipation affects about 63 million people in the United States. A common cause of constipation is not getting enough fiber in your diet. The main symptom of constipation is straining to go. In most cases, increasing fiber, fluids, and exercise will solve this condition. Use laxatives only as a temporary solution.

Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are painful, swollen blood vessels in the anal canal. Symptoms include pain, itching, and bright red blood after a bowel movement. Constipation and pregnancy are major causes. Hemorrhoids are common, with 75% of people older than 45 having them. It helps to avoid constipation by adding fiber and plenty of fluids to your diet. Try hemorrhoid cream, suppositories, or a warm bath to relieve pain and itchiness. It may feel a little embarrassing to talk about hemorrhoids, but don’t let that stop you from seeking help if hemorrhoids persist.

Diverticular Disease

Diverticular disease includes diverticulosis—small pouches that form in the wall of your colon and diverticulitis and become inflamed. Roughly half of people ages 60 to 80 have this condition. You may feel bloated, constipated, or pain in your lower abdomen. Treatment usually includes changing what you eat. If you have bleeding from your rectum, see your doctor right away. You many need antibiotics, a liquid diet, or even surgery to treat diverticulitis.

Gallstones

The gallbladder is an organ attached to your intestine that stores bile—a digestive juice. Bile can form small, hard deposits called gallstones. About 20 million Americans have gallstones, but not all of them are a problem. Some gallstones don’t cause symptoms and go away on their own. Others can cause severe pain or infection. You may also have nausea, vomiting, and fever. Surgery is the usual treatment for gallstones that cause these gallbladder attacks.

Our Digestion Formula contains Pama Oregano, Una De Gato, Sangre De Grado, Menta and Paico.

Pama Oregano is great for indigestion. It relieves inflammation and eliminates toxins in the body. It also has antibacterial properties and prevents diarrhea.

Una De Gato. Una de Gato aids with gastritis, ulcers, and various intestinal disorders. It is effective for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and leaky gut syndrome, and can inhibit stress-induced ulcer formation. It is also used for diarrhea and stomach aches.

Sangre De Grado contains a chemical called Crofelemer. Research shows that taking Crofelemer reduces diarrhea in people with AIDS-related diarrhea. Similarly, Sangre de Drago can also be applied and taken to prevent wounds from becoming infected. Natural antibacterial health benefits in Sangre de Drago can help kill a variety of bacteria. For food safety, Sangre de Drago has shown to kill dangerous foodborne pathogens like E. coli. Sangre de Drago also has important health benefits for improved digestive health from alleviating diarrhea to healing stomach ulcers. For ulcers specifically, Sangre de Drago can help eliminate the H. pylori bacteria that are responsible for causing peptic ulcers in many people.

Menta may improve Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common digestive tract disorder. It is characterized by digestive symptoms like stomach pain, gas, bloating and changes in bowel habits. Although treatment for IBS often includes dietary changes and taking medications, research shows that taking peppermint oil as an herbal remedy might also be helpful.

Peppermint oil contains a compound called menthol, which is thought to help alleviate IBS symptoms through its relaxing effects on the muscles of the digestive tract.

A review of nine studies including over 700 patients with IBS found that taking peppermint oil capsules improved IBS symptoms significantly more than placebo capsules (6Trusted Source).

One study found that 75% of patients who took peppermint oil for four weeks showed improvements in IBS symptoms, compared to 38% of the patients in the placebo group.

Paico is a plant that is able to eliminate parasites and also improves intestinal transit. This plant has an antispasmodic and carminative property. That means that it is one of the natural remedies for intestinal gas from the digestive tract. So, it is widely used in case you suffer from stomach cramps or spasms. You can take it if you need to relieve these stomach pains. It is also used in diarrhea and indigestion. As well as in infusion. It has been shown according to a series of studies that this plant has an effect on hemorrhoids. Its local anti-inflammatory property is due which helps to reduce the inflammation of the affected area.

We feel that the combination of all of these herbs. Had amazing effects on the Digestion system.

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/digestive-system-how-it-works

https://www.healthgrades.com/right-care/digestive-health/10-common-digestive-disorders

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266259#benefits

https://www.healthguideinfo.com/herbal-medicine/p33609/

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-755/sangre-de-grado

https://www.curesdecoded.com/Products/Sangre-de-Drago/1027

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/mint-benefits

http://depressiontrouble.com/use-of-paico/

The Digestion Formula Description en Español

Nuestra Fórmula de Digestión contiene Pama Oregano, Una De Gato, Sangre De Grado, Menta & Paico.

Pama Oregano alivia la inflamación y elimina las toxinas del organismo. También tiene propiedades antibacterianas y previene la diarrea.

Una De Gato ayuda con gastritis, úlceras y diversos trastornos intestinales. Es eficaz para la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (EII) y el síndrome del intestino permeable, y puede inhibir la formación de úlceras inducidas por el estrés. También se utiliza para la diarrea y los dolores de estómago.

Sangre De Grado contiene un químico llamado Crofelemer que reduce la diarrea. Sangre de Drago puede ayudar a eliminar la bacteria H. pylori que es responsable de causar úlceras pépticas en muchas personas.

Menta mejora el síndrome del intestino irritable. Se caracteriza por síntomas digestivos como dolor de estómago, gases, hinchazón y cambios en los hábitos intestinales.

Paico elimina los parásitos y también mejora el tránsito intestinal. Esta planta tiene propiedades antiespasmódicas y carminativas. Eso significa que es uno de los remedios naturales para los gases intestinales del tracto digestivo, calambres o espasmos de estómago.

Una combinación de las 5 hierbas, hace un ejército fuerte para mejorar su sistema digestivo.

Lectura Adicional

 

La digestión es importante porque su cuerpo necesita los nutrientes de los alimentos y bebidas para funcionar correctamente y mantenerse saludable. Las proteínas, las grasas, los carbohidratos, las vitaminas, los minerales y el agua son nutrientes. Su sistema digestivo divide los nutrientes en partes lo suficientemente pequeñas como para que su cuerpo las absorba y las use para generar energía, crecimiento y reparación celular.

Los alimentos se mueven a través de su tracto gastrointestinal mediante un proceso llamado peristalsis. Los órganos grandes y huecos de su tracto gastrointestinal contienen una capa de músculo que permite que sus paredes se muevan. El movimiento empuja los alimentos y los líquidos a través de su tracto gastrointestinal y mezcla el contenido dentro de cada órgano. El músculo detrás de la comida se contrae y aprieta la comida hacia adelante, mientras que el músculo delante de la comida se relaja para permitir que la comida se mueva.

Boca. Los alimentos comienzan a moverse a través de su tracto gastrointestinal cuando come. Cuando traga, su lengua empuja la comida hacia su garganta. Un pequeño colgajo de tejido, llamado epiglotis, se pliega sobre la tráquea para evitar que se atragante y la comida pase al esófago.

Esófago. Una vez que comienzas a tragar, el proceso se vuelve automático. Su cerebro envía señales a los músculos del esófago y comienza la peristalsis.

Esfínter esofágico inferior. Cuando la comida llega al final de su esófago, un músculo en forma de anillo, llamado esfínter esofágico inferior, se relaja y deja que la comida pase al estómago. Este esfínter generalmente permanece cerrado para evitar que lo que está en su estómago regrese al esófago.

Estómago. Después de que la comida ingresa al estómago, los músculos del estómago mezclan la comida y el líquido con los jugos digestivos. El estómago vacía lentamente su contenido, llamado quimo, en el intestino delgado.

Intestino delgado. Los músculos del intestino delgado mezclan los alimentos con los jugos digestivos del páncreas, el hígado y el intestino, y empujan la mezcla hacia adelante para una mayor digestión. Las paredes del intestino delgado absorben agua y los nutrientes digeridos en el torrente sanguíneo. A medida que continúa la peristalsis, los productos de desecho del proceso digestivo se mueven hacia el intestino grueso.

Intestino grueso. Los productos de desecho del proceso digestivo incluyen partes no digeridas de alimentos, líquidos y células más viejas del revestimiento del tracto gastrointestinal. El intestino grueso absorbe agua y transforma los desechos líquidos en heces. La peristalsis ayuda a mover las heces hacia el recto.

Recto. El extremo inferior de su intestino grueso, el recto, almacena las heces, hasta que empuja las heces fuera de su ano durante una evacuación intestinal.

A medida que la comida se mueve a través de su tracto gastrointestinal, sus órganos digestivos rompen la comida en partes más pequeñas usando:

  • movimiento, como masticar, apretar y mezclar
  • jugos digestivos, como ácido del estómago, bilis y enzimas

Boca. El proceso digestivo comienza en la boca cuando mastica. Las glándulas salivales producen saliva, un jugo digestivo que humedece los alimentos para que se muevan más fácilmente a través del esófago hasta el estómago. La saliva también tiene una enzima que comienza a descomponer los almidones en los alimentos.

Esófago. Después de tragar, la peristalsis empuja la comida por el esófago hasta el estómago.

Estómago. Las glándulas del revestimiento del estómago producen ácido y enzimas que descomponen los alimentos. Los músculos de su estómago mezclan la comida con estos jugos digestivos.

Páncreas. Su páncreas produce un jugo digestivo que tiene enzimas que descomponen los carbohidratos, las grasas y las proteínas. El páncreas lleva el jugo digestivo al intestino delgado a través de pequeños conductos llamados conductos.

Hígado. Su hígado produce un jugo digestivo llamado bilis que ayuda a digerir las grasas y algunas vitaminas. Los conductos biliares transportan la bilis desde el hígado hasta la vesícula biliar para su almacenamiento o hasta el intestino delgado para su uso.

Vesícula biliar. Su vesícula biliar almacena bilis entre comidas. Cuando come, su vesícula biliar exprime la bilis a través de los conductos biliares hacia el intestino delgado.

Intestino delgado. Su intestino delgado produce jugo digestivo, que se mezcla con la bilis y el jugo pancreático para completar la descomposición de proteínas, carbohidratos y grasas. Las bacterias del intestino delgado producen algunas de las enzimas que necesita para digerir los carbohidratos. Su intestino delgado mueve el agua del torrente sanguíneo al tracto gastrointestinal para ayudar a descomponer los alimentos. Su intestino delgado también absorbe agua con otros nutrientes.

Intestino grueso. En su intestino grueso, se mueve más agua desde su tracto gastrointestinal al torrente sanguíneo. Las bacterias en el intestino grueso ayudan a descomponer los nutrientes restantes y producen vitamina K. Los productos de desecho de la digestión, incluidas las partes de los alimentos que aún son demasiado grandes, se convierten en heces.

El intestino delgado absorbe la mayoría de los nutrientes de los alimentos y el sistema circulatorio los pasa a otras partes del cuerpo para almacenarlos o utilizarlos. Células especiales ayudan a que los nutrientes absorbidos atraviesen el revestimiento intestinal hasta el torrente sanguíneo. Su sangre transporta azúcares simples, aminoácidos, glicerol y algunas vitaminas y sales al hígado. Su hígado almacena, procesa y entrega nutrientes al resto de su cuerpo cuando es necesario.

El enlace externo NIH del sistema linfático, una red de vasos que transportan glóbulos blancos y un líquido llamado linfa por todo el cuerpo para combatir las infecciones, absorbe ácidos grasos y vitaminas.

Su cuerpo usa azúcares, aminoácidos, ácidos grasos y glicerol para producir sustancias que necesita para la energía, el crecimiento y la reparación celular.

Sus hormonas y nervios trabajan juntos para ayudar a controlar el proceso digestivo. Las señales fluyen dentro de su tracto GI y van y vienen de su tracto GI a su cerebro.

Las células que recubren el estómago y el intestino delgado producen y liberan hormonas que controlan el funcionamiento de su sistema digestivo. Estas hormonas le dicen a su cuerpo cuándo producir jugos digestivos y envían señales a su cerebro de que tiene hambre o está lleno. Su páncreas también produce hormonas que son importantes para la digestión.

Tiene nervios que conectan su sistema nervioso central, su cerebro y médula espinal, con su sistema digestivo y controlan algunas funciones digestivas. Por ejemplo, cuando ve u huele comida, su cerebro envía una señal que hace que sus glándulas salivales "se le hagan la boca agua" para prepararlo para comer.

También tiene un sistema nervioso entérico (ENS): nervios dentro de las paredes de su tracto gastrointestinal. Cuando los alimentos estiran las paredes de su tracto gastrointestinal, los nervios de su ENS liberan muchas sustancias diferentes que aceleran o retrasan el movimiento de los alimentos y la producción de jugos digestivos. Los nervios envían señales para controlar las acciones de los músculos intestinales para contraerse y relajarse para empujar la comida a través de los intestinos.

Hay al menos 10 trastornos digestivos.

Enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico (ERGE)

Si tiene acidez o reflujo ácido más de un par de veces a la semana, es posible que tenga la enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico o ERGE. El esófago mueve los alimentos ingeridos hasta el estómago. Un anillo de músculos, el esfínter esofágico inferior (EEI), conecta el estómago y el esófago. Cuando el LES está débil, el ácido del estómago puede volver al esófago y causar acidez. Esto puede causar serios daños a su esófago con el tiempo. Aproximadamente el 20% de los estadounidenses sufren de ERGE. Puede tratar la ERGE con cambios en el estilo de vida, como cambiar qué y cuándo come, y comer comidas más pequeñas. Los antiácidos o los bloqueadores de ácido de prescripción médica también pueden ayudar.

Enfermedad de úlcera péptica (PUD) y gastritis

PUD es una llaga abierta en el revestimiento del estómago o en la parte superior del intestino delgado. Afecta a más de 15 millones de estadounidenses. La gastritis es una inflamación del revestimiento del estómago. Estas dos afecciones tienen síntomas similares, que incluyen dolor de estómago y náuseas, y causas similares. Una infección bacteriana, H. pylori, es la causa más común de PUD y, a menudo, causa gastritis crónica. Los AINE, que incluyen aspirina, ibuprofeno y naproxeno, son otra causa común. Los antiácidos y los inhibidores de la bomba de protones a menudo ayudan. Los antibióticos tratan la infección por H. pylori.

Gripe estomacal

La gripe estomacal, o gastroenteritis, es una infección del estómago y la parte superior del intestino delgado. Los síntomas comunes son diarrea, vómitos, dolor de estómago y calambres. El rotavirus y el norovirus, que afectan a millones de personas cada año, suelen ser la causa. La gastroenteritis a menudo desaparece por sí sola, pero pierde líquidos a través de la diarrea y los vómitos. Evite la deshidratación bebiendo agua y bebidas electrolíticas.

Sensibilidad al gluten y enfermedad celíaca

Los síntomas de la sensibilidad al gluten y la enfermedad celíaca son similares. Incluyen diarrea, hinchazón y dolor abdominal. La sensibilidad al gluten es relativamente común y afecta aproximadamente al 5% de la población de EE. UU. La verdadera enfermedad celíaca afecta a menos del 1%. Es importante consultar a su médico para obtener un diagnóstico correcto; no intente autodiagnosticarse. A diferencia de la sensibilidad al gluten, la celiaquía es una enfermedad autoinmune que puede dañar el intestino delgado. Eliminar el gluten, una proteína en el trigo, el centeno, la cebada y la avena, de su dieta es el tratamiento principal para ambas afecciones.

Enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (EII)

La enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (EII) se refiere a una inflamación prolongada en el tracto digestivo. La enfermedad de Crohn y la colitis ulcerosa son los dos tipos más comunes de enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal. La EII afecta a aproximadamente 1,5 millones de estadounidenses, incluida la enfermedad de Crohn y la colitis ulcerosa. Son enfermedades autoinmunes, lo que significa que hay una reacción anormal del sistema inmunológico. La EII causa irritación e hinchazón, lo que resulta en diarrea, dolor abdominal, pérdida de apetito, fiebre y pérdida de peso. La enfermedad de Crohn afecta principalmente al final del intestino delgado y al comienzo del colon. La colitis ulcerosa afecta solo el colon y el recto. Los medicamentos que bloquean su respuesta inmunológica pueden tratar la EII. A veces es necesaria una cirugía.

Síndrome del intestino irritable (SII)

Las personas a veces confunden IBS con IBD. El SII es un dolor abdominal que ocurre al menos tres veces al mes durante tres meses seguidos. También puede tener estreñimiento o diarrea. A diferencia de la EII, el SII no daña el tracto digestivo y es mucho más común. Más de 15 millones de estadounidenses tienen IBS. La causa exacta del SII no está clara. El tratamiento puede incluir comer comidas más pequeñas y evitar los alimentos que causan síntomas. Algunas personas toman laxantes, suplementos de fibra o probióticos para tratar el SII.

Estreñimiento

El estreñimiento es una evacuación difícil o infrecuente de las heces. Si tiene evacuaciones intestinales menos de tres veces por semana, es probable que esté estreñido. El estreñimiento crónico afecta a alrededor de 63 millones de personas en los Estados Unidos. Una causa común de estreñimiento es no consumir suficiente fibra en su dieta. El síntoma principal del estreñimiento es esforzarse para ir. En la mayoría de los casos, el aumento de fibra, líquidos y ejercicio resolverá esta condición. Use laxantes solo como una solución temporal.

Hemorroides

Las hemorroides son vasos sanguíneos inflamados y dolorosos en el canal anal. Los síntomas incluyen dolor, picazón y sangre de color rojo brillante después de defecar. El estreñimiento y el embarazo son causas importantes. Las hemorroides son comunes y el 75% de las personas mayores de 45 años las padecen. Ayuda a evitar el estreñimiento agregando fibra y muchos líquidos a su dieta. Pruebe con cremas para hemorroides, supositorios o un baño tibio para aliviar el dolor y la picazón. Puede resultar un poco vergonzoso hablar sobre las hemorroides, pero no deje que eso le impida buscar ayuda si las hemorroides persisten.

Enfermedad diverticular

La enfermedad diverticular incluye diverticulosis: pequeñas bolsas que se forman en la pared del colon y diverticulitis y se inflaman. Aproximadamente la mitad de las personas de 60 a 80 años padecen esta afección. Puede sentir hinchazón, estreñimiento o dolor en la parte inferior del abdomen. El tratamiento generalmente incluye cambiar lo que come. Si tiene sangrado por el recto, consulte a su médico de inmediato. Muchos necesitan antibióticos, una dieta líquida o incluso una cirugía para tratar la diverticulitis.

Cálculos biliares

La vesícula biliar es un órgano adherido al intestino que almacena bilis, un jugo digestivo. La bilis puede formar depósitos pequeños y duros llamados cálculos biliares. Aproximadamente 20 millones de estadounidenses tienen cálculos biliares, pero no todos son un problema. Algunos cálculos biliares no causan síntomas y desaparecen por sí solos. Otros pueden causar dolor intenso o infección. También puede tener náuseas, vómitos y fiebre. La cirugía es el tratamiento habitual para los cálculos biliares que causan estos ataques de la vesícula biliar.

Nuestra fórmula de digestión contiene Pama Oregano, Una De Gato, Sangre De Grado, Menta y Paico.

Pama Oregano es ideal para la indigestión. Alivia la inflamación y elimina las toxinas del organismo. También tiene propiedades antibacterianas y previene la diarrea.  

Una De Gato. Una de Gato ayuda con gastritis, úlceras y diversos trastornos intestinales. Es eficaz para la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (EII) y el síndrome del intestino permeable, y puede inhibir la formación de úlceras inducidas por el estrés. También se utiliza para la diarrea y los dolores de estómago.

Sangre De Grado contiene una sustancia química llamada Crofelemer. Las investigaciones muestran que tomar Crofelemer reduce la diarrea en personas con diarrea relacionada con el SIDA. Asimismo, Sangre de Drago también se puede aplicar y tomar para evitar que las heridas se infecten. Los beneficios para la salud antibacterianos naturales en Sangre de Drago pueden ayudar a matar una variedad de bacterias. Para la seguridad alimentaria, Sangre de Drago ha demostrado que mata patógenos peligrosos transmitidos por los alimentos como E. coli. Sangre de Drago también tiene importantes beneficios para la salud para mejorar la salud digestiva, desde aliviar la diarrea hasta curar las úlceras de estómago. Para las úlceras específicamente, Sangre de Drago puede ayudar a eliminar la bacteria H. pylori que es responsable de causar úlceras pépticas en muchas personas.

Menta puede mejorar el síndrome del intestino irritable

El síndrome del intestino irritable (SII) es un trastorno común del tracto digestivo. Se caracteriza por síntomas digestivos como dolor de estómago, gases, hinchazón y cambios en los hábitos intestinales.

Aunque el tratamiento para el SII a menudo incluye cambios en la dieta y tomar medicamentos, las investigaciones muestran que tomar aceite de menta como remedio a base de hierbas también podría ser útil.

El aceite de menta contiene un compuesto llamado mentol, que se cree que ayuda a aliviar los síntomas del SII a través de sus efectos relajantes en los músculos del tracto digestivo.

Una revisión de nueve estudios que incluyeron a más de 700 pacientes con IBS encontró que tomar cápsulas de aceite de menta mejoró los síntomas del IBS significativamente más que las cápsulas de placebo (6 Fuente confiable).

Un estudio encontró que el 75% de los pacientes que tomaron aceite de menta durante cuatro semanas mostraron mejoras en los síntomas del SII, en comparación con el 38% de los pacientes del grupo placebo.

Paico es una planta que es capaz de eliminar parásitos y también mejora el tránsito intestinal. Esta planta tiene propiedades antiespasmódicas y carminativas. Eso significa que es uno de los remedios naturales para los gases intestinales del tracto digestivo. Por lo tanto, es muy utilizado en caso de que sufra calambres o espasmos de estómago. Puede tomarlo si necesita aliviar estos dolores de estómago. También se utiliza en diarrea e indigestión. Así como en infusión. Se ha demostrado según una serie de estudios que esta planta tiene efecto sobre las hemorroides. Se debe su propiedad antiinflamatoria local que ayuda a reducir la inflamación de la zona afectada.

Creemos que la combinación de todas estas hierbas. Tuvo efectos asombrosos en el sistema de digestión.

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/digestive-system-how-it-works

https://www.healthgrades.com/right-care/digestive-health/10-common-digestive-disorders

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266259#benefits

https://www.healthguideinfo.com/herbal-medicine/p33609/

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-755/sangre-de-grado

https://www.curesdecoded.com/Products/Sangre-de-Drago/1027

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/mint-benefits

http://depressiontrouble.com/use-of-paico/